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  • Cantankeris

    I'll stake my career on Glennon panning out

    By Cantankeris

    Source: I'll stake my career on Glennon panning out
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  • tmservo

    Josh Freeman: How success at no level added up to NFL Failure

    By tmservo

    The last week has been filled with a lot of questions about Josh Freeman. Why did he fail? How did he fail? Who's fault was it? I, like a lot of Bucs fans rooted for Freeman to succeed. But looking back at it, I wonder where we ever came up with the idea that it was some external force that led Freeman to fail.   When Freeman was recruited for college out of Grandview, Missouri he had a lot of key skills - big size, a decent arm, he could catch and throw and he took the game at an ease. The knock on Freeman was that he would take prestige games off and slack through drills because he was significantly better then his teammates. During his Jr. Year, coming off of an 8-3 2005, several major programs visited Freeman, but in the end it was a battle of four: Oklahoma, Kansas State, Nebraska and Missouri by all accounts. While we don't know for sure (*cough* *cough* Oklahoma *cough* *cough*) one program implied to Freeman that he should be come into college as a tight end, not a QB. Josh Freeman's father took it as a 'racial slight' (check Wikipedia for Freeman) and Freeman came down to Kansas State and Nebraska.   After a meeting with Bill Snyder, Freeman decided that Snyder's approach: that Freeman would need to change his work ethic and he would be unlikely to start but he could grow into the role didn't work for him. Freeman committed to Nebraska, where Bill Callahan promised Freeman a fast track to start at Nebraska. But Freeman's 2005 Senior season wasn't as solid as his Jr & Sophomore efforts, while his yards were up, his percentage completion rate wasn't moving (53%) and his team sputtered going 7-4 and one out of the playoffs.   Throughout his HS career, despite all the accolades, Freeman had never managed to get a highly talented team past the first round of the state level playoffs. As Bill Snyder retired, Ron Prince made a last minute pitch to Freeman: come into our program, and you can start in your first year. It was too good of an offer for Freeman, who quickly found himself jumping to Kansas State and breaking his commitment to Nebraska.   Season Team GP Rating Att Comp % Yds TD Int Att Yds TD 2006 Kansas State Wildcats 11 103.45 270 140 51.9 1,780 6 15 54 −21 2 2007 Kansas State Wildcats 12 127.26 499 316 63.3 3,353 18 11 53 −40 4 2008 Kansas State Wildcats 12 136.49 382 224 58.6 2,945 20 8 107 404 14   Freeman's tenure at Kansas State through three years generated stats... and a lot of losses. NFL scouts looked at his diminishing INTs and number of attempts and assumped Freeman was going to be the next thing in the NFL draft. But despite a solid offensive line and future NFL star Jordy Nelson, the Wildcats never took hold under Freeman, going 5-7 twice, including a loss to a downtrodden KU team and a complete collapse in the 2008 season, Freeman's last in the college ranks.   With Prince gone, and Snyder's return eminent, Freeman elected to not return for a senior season.   "The worst thing that could have happened to Josh was being selected so high in the draft. It was shocking for a kid who had never won anything at any level." noted Kevin Keitzman, 810 WHB Radio host. "He felt like he was the next Joe Montana, and the moment adversity hit at K-State and the moment going got rough and coaches changed he split on K-State, just like he's trying to pout and split on Tampa."   Freeman so far has been through numerous coaches. 2 in High School. 1 in college leaving before another, two at the pro level. That makes five. It is sometimes easy to blame the coach for his failures; but after five coaches and no success at any level, at some point you have to wonder if at least part of the problem isn't Freeman himself.
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Review of 2016 Buccaneers Coaching Staff Hirings

Review of Buccaneers' Coaching Staff       Following the NFL's sixteen-week regular season, many NFL franchises contemplated making immediate changes to improve for the upcoming season. One of the major changes NFL franchises typically make is altering their coaching staffs. In fact, this year alone seven out of thirty-two NFL teams decided to fire their current coaches and hire new head coaches. The most criticized move this offseason was the decision to fire Buccaneers head coach, Lovie Smith. Based on the Buccaneers' performance under his coaching, it was bound to happen. Last year the Buccaneers were the most penalized team in the NFL with a record of only six wins compared to ten losses. Following the firing of Coach Smith, the Buccaneers made the controversial decision to promote the offensive coordinator, Dirk Koetter, to the head coach. I feel as though with Koetter in charge, fans should expect improvement from last year.   Although last season was dismal for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' fans, there were a few reasons to be optimistic about the upcoming season. Last year the reason that stood out most was the production offensive side of the ball. They were ranked as one the top five run offenses and pass offenses last year, even with the rookie quarterback, Jameis Winston. The year prior to that they were ranked in the last five overall. Most of the credit should be attributed to Dirk Koetter's success as an offensive coordinator. A coordinator's job is self-explanatory: an offensive coordinator coordinates the offense to work properly and a defensive coordinator does likewise for the defense. Most coordinators call the plays on game day for their side of the ball, but some head coaches reserve that responsibility for themselves. After his success calling the plays last year, Dirk Koetter decided it was in the team's best interest that he retain play-calling duties for the upcoming season. Koetter taking over as head coach will allow him the opportunity work some of his magic on the defense as well.   In an effort to keep the offense operating efficiently, Dirk Koetter kept most of the same individuals working in the same positions as last year. The only difference is that he conjoined the position that he used to hold with the wide receivers coach and hired Todd Monken to hold the position. Todd Monken held the position of wide receivers coach when Dirk Koetter was the offensive coordinator for Jacksonville Jaguars during the 2007-2010 seasons. From that past experience, both coaches have exceptional chemistry and familiarity with one another. For the past three years, Monken worked as a head coach to improve a college football team in Southern Mississippi from a team that never won to a team ranked 19th in overall offense.   The defensive side of the ball was the seventh worse scoring defense in the NFL and was mostly ineffective last year. Koetter appointed Mike Smith, a defensive-minded head coach he worked with in Atlanta, as his defensive coordinator. Although many people questioned the choice to have the same coaches in charge that the Atlanta Falcons fired two years ago, it was a smart decision. Mike Smith's downfall in Atlanta was due to bad luck in his last season where he ended with a similar record as Lovie Smith. Most of the starting offensive linemen were injured and could not play for more than half the year. Given the opportunity at hand these two can be as productive they were in 2011 and 2012 in Atlanta, where they reached the playoffs.   With new incoming talent and a well-renowned coaching staff taking over, there is plenty of reason to be optimistic about the upcoming NFL season of the Buccaneers. The last time this current staff of coaches all worked together in Jacksonville, they had won eleven games compared to only five losses and only lost a playoff game to a team that went to the super bowl. This coaching staff is clearly a cohesive unit that will bring much success to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and optimism for years to come for their fans.

Chacho Jordan

Chacho Jordan

 

Lovie is a loser.

Lovie Smith took the team out to lunch since it was a late kickoff. KFC, all you can eat. I guess they did not did not care to wash their hands after eating that greasy ass food. You know how those thugs like that shit. Although, I'm sure they did not eat grease back in their homeland. Damn thugs. The same thugs that cannot keep their cool.   Fire that loser head coach. He cannot win without Urlacher, a NON thud.

Zaclan

Zaclan

 

The Naive Opinion and the Bottom Line

The Offenses:   1) Getting rid of (one of) the best corner(s) in the NFL having traded a 1st and a conditional 3rd to get him less than 12 months earlier.   2) Hoping to trade the guy and announcing to the world that the other alternative was to cut him.   3) Signing Alterraun Verner, (arguably) the best corner in this year's free agent class, for more than $6M per and guaranteeing the rest of the NFL that the "cut" threat was no boast.   4) Washing out their existing cap space on Day 1 and lining up a bevy of players at need positions for visits on Day 2, including Charles Tillman (yet another starting-caliber corner).   The Naive Opinion:   These jokers telegraphed their move. If they had any chance of actually trading Revis, which I'm not sure they should, they've ruined their chances. By going public with their desire to trade him, and more importantly, their commitment to cut him in the 24th hour of the league season, they've fitted their own coffins.   What team, in their right mind, is going to trade for a guy who will most likely hit the open market in 24 hours?   Worse than telegraphing their move, they removed the remotest possibility that they were bluffing. They blanched out their entire cap in the first 8 hours of open market and lined up enough guys for Day 2 that they couldn't possibly be bluffing about cutting Revis if the trade option fell through.   What team, in their right mind, is going to trade for a guy who is guaranteed to hit the open market in 12 hours?   The Seven Truths:   1) Jason Licht and Lovie Smith knew some time ago that they had some serious work to do to reform this roster.   2) The front office and staff knew they couldn't afford to revamp their roster and keep Darrelle Revis around soaking up better than 10% of the cap.   3) The organization spent a 1st and a 4th to get Revis, it'd be a real shame not to get something in return other than 16 games of limited action.   4) Whether they kept Revis or attempted to trade him, it was beneficial to get him to restructure.   5) The best case scenario for finding a trade partner and deriving value from the trade was to have more than one suitor.   6) If they had to revamp the roster, needed Revis off their cap to do it, and needed more than one suitor, they needed a time constraint, a pressure bulkhead, an ultimatum.   7) The Revis trade (the one that brought him to Tampa) wasn't their idea.   The Bottom Line:   A good bit of work was needed (or desired) on this roster. They couldn't do it with Revis at his current figure. If he restructures, maybe you keep him. If he restructures, certainly he's easier to trade. If faced with the specter of the open market, and not making his $16M anyway, perhaps he remits a little rather than losing it all. If faced with an open market bidding war, perhaps the non-Denvers and not-New Englands pony up some picks to keep the commodity off the market.   The only mistake Licht and Lovie could make, was thinking of Revis as something they "needed". The previous regime thought that, and they are now unemployed. The 1st and the 4th aren't coming back. The 3rd and the $16M are still available to help this team.   What this whole thing boiled down to was whether Darrelle Revis was worth trading a 3rd for a 4th and forfeiting more than 10% of cap space.     Source: The Naive Opinion and the Bottom Line

Cantankeris

Cantankeris

 

Josh Freeman: How success at no level added up to NFL Failure

The last week has been filled with a lot of questions about Josh Freeman. Why did he fail? How did he fail? Who's fault was it? I, like a lot of Bucs fans rooted for Freeman to succeed. But looking back at it, I wonder where we ever came up with the idea that it was some external force that led Freeman to fail.   When Freeman was recruited for college out of Grandview, Missouri he had a lot of key skills - big size, a decent arm, he could catch and throw and he took the game at an ease. The knock on Freeman was that he would take prestige games off and slack through drills because he was significantly better then his teammates. During his Jr. Year, coming off of an 8-3 2005, several major programs visited Freeman, but in the end it was a battle of four: Oklahoma, Kansas State, Nebraska and Missouri by all accounts. While we don't know for sure (*cough* *cough* Oklahoma *cough* *cough*) one program implied to Freeman that he should be come into college as a tight end, not a QB. Josh Freeman's father took it as a 'racial slight' (check Wikipedia for Freeman) and Freeman came down to Kansas State and Nebraska.   After a meeting with Bill Snyder, Freeman decided that Snyder's approach: that Freeman would need to change his work ethic and he would be unlikely to start but he could grow into the role didn't work for him. Freeman committed to Nebraska, where Bill Callahan promised Freeman a fast track to start at Nebraska. But Freeman's 2005 Senior season wasn't as solid as his Jr & Sophomore efforts, while his yards were up, his percentage completion rate wasn't moving (53%) and his team sputtered going 7-4 and one out of the playoffs.   Throughout his HS career, despite all the accolades, Freeman had never managed to get a highly talented team past the first round of the state level playoffs. As Bill Snyder retired, Ron Prince made a last minute pitch to Freeman: come into our program, and you can start in your first year. It was too good of an offer for Freeman, who quickly found himself jumping to Kansas State and breaking his commitment to Nebraska.   Season Team GP Rating Att Comp % Yds TD Int Att Yds TD 2006 Kansas State Wildcats 11 103.45 270 140 51.9 1,780 6 15 54 −21 2 2007 Kansas State Wildcats 12 127.26 499 316 63.3 3,353 18 11 53 −40 4 2008 Kansas State Wildcats 12 136.49 382 224 58.6 2,945 20 8 107 404 14   Freeman's tenure at Kansas State through three years generated stats... and a lot of losses. NFL scouts looked at his diminishing INTs and number of attempts and assumped Freeman was going to be the next thing in the NFL draft. But despite a solid offensive line and future NFL star Jordy Nelson, the Wildcats never took hold under Freeman, going 5-7 twice, including a loss to a downtrodden KU team and a complete collapse in the 2008 season, Freeman's last in the college ranks.   With Prince gone, and Snyder's return eminent, Freeman elected to not return for a senior season.   "The worst thing that could have happened to Josh was being selected so high in the draft. It was shocking for a kid who had never won anything at any level." noted Kevin Keitzman, 810 WHB Radio host. "He felt like he was the next Joe Montana, and the moment adversity hit at K-State and the moment going got rough and coaches changed he split on K-State, just like he's trying to pout and split on Tampa."   Freeman so far has been through numerous coaches. 2 in High School. 1 in college leaving before another, two at the pro level. That makes five. It is sometimes easy to blame the coach for his failures; but after five coaches and no success at any level, at some point you have to wonder if at least part of the problem isn't Freeman himself.

tmservo

tmservo

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